Space City Inspections

Scope of Inspection

A structural and mechanical inspection is limited to what your inspector can gain access to and see. If the roof pitch is too steep to walk on or if the access is otherwise impeded, the inspection will be limited to what can be seen from the ground. Or, if the attic is cluttered with stored items or the crawl space is too low, the inspection will be limited to what can be seen from the attic stairway or scuttle.

There may be items of systems which are not included in the normal home inspection. These would be the ype of things that most  home do not have. (See Inspection Points #17 Optional Items for the most common ones.) The list is only limited by the human imagination and there are additional charges related to inspecting these items.

A Professional Inspector has extensive training in many areas, but is still considered a generalist, not specialist. If your inspection finds an indication of a possible problem with say, the air conditioning system, you should consider calling a specialist in that field for further evaluation.

In almost all cases, an inspector will find several things to report-even in new or well maintained homes. The inspection is not a warranty. If you are concerned about future problems, you may want to consider purchasing a home warranty.

Many people confuse inspectors and appraisers. The inspection is not an appraisal. The value of your home can be affected by many things besides its conditions. Most mortgage lenders will require an appraisal as a part of the loan process.

F.A.Q.

Some of these questions are answered on other pages of our website, but are presented here, too, for your convenience.

Q. My realtor gave me a list of inspectors. How do I pick the right one?
A. Call a few and talk to them. Ask them about their background and experience. Be sure they are properly licensed. If your concerns are not addressed to your satisfaction, call another one. For licensing requirements, click this link for the Texas Real Estate Commission website.

Q. What all does an inspector look at?
A. We have a whole page dedicated to that question. Click this link to view Inspection Points. Then click the FAQs link in the left column of the page.

Q. How long will the inspection take?
A. For a home of 2000 sq. ft. in average condition, it takes 2-3 hours. Size, age, and condition can affect the time needed to complete an inspection.

Q. My dad fixes up old houses to sell and rent. Why can't he do the inspection?
A. Professional home inspectors have had extensive training and were required to pass a rigorous licensing test for the Texas Real Estate Commission. Professional inspectors' training and experience give them a “feel” for problems and the knowledge to look a little closer when something does not “feel” right.

Q. Do I have to be there during the inspection?
A. No, it is not necessary for you to be there, but we really wish you would be. You may find it inconvenient, but you will be happy you were there. See Preparing for Inspection for more details.

Q. Can you do a termite inspection also?
A. No, that requires a different license. But we can arrange one for you. Just let us know you need it and we’ll have a licensed termite inspector there the same day we are.

Q. May I call you if I have questions later?
A. Absolutely! Most people do have a few questions, especially those who were not present during the inspection. We are happy to visit with you as many times as you wish.

Q. Will I receive a written report?
A. Yes. The Texas Real Estate Commission requires that all inspectors give you a written report; and they have promulgated a form which we are required by law to use. We can add to it and make it more detailed, but we are not allowed to subtract from it in any way. To have a look at a sample inspection report just click here.

Additionally, the Texas Real Estate Commission provides a list of frequently asked questions on their website. To view them, click here.